Keeping Track of Great Content on Google+

 

It’s one thing to put something aside to read later. It’s quite another to remember where you had put it.

When I was a kid, my Mom was fond of putting things away for good.

I wasn’t sure whether that meant putting them away forever or putting them to keep them good.

Everyday I come across content that I don’t want to lose.

I tried bookmarking sites like Delicious.com, using my browser favorites and Google Bookmarks. Inevitably, I dessert them and all the links they contain because they become so unwieldy that I forget what I was looking for before I get halfway through the list. Yes, I can hear you– “but organize your stuff in folders, Ray!”

That’s work.

 

plus oneto the rescue!

 

Just after opening my account on Google+, I discovered some cool ways to keep track of the great content that I find online and in my G+ streams.

The first tip is to use the +1 button.

Ray Hiltz - Google Plus +1 tab

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Every time you click on a +1 icon anywhere on the web, you are doing a few things.

You giving the article a thumbs up, much like a “Facebook “like” button and recommending it to your friends.

You’re helping that site rank a bit better in search ranking AND, if you have a Google+ page, you’re bookmarking that article on your profile page.

As you can see with the screen shot above, all the links that I have “+1’d” on outside sites are listed under the +1 tab on my profile page. – You can choose to share this tab or keep it private.

The reason I specify outside sites is that this doesn’t work for posts inside your Google+ stream.

Send your Favourite posts to Evernote!

As you know, you can circle people in Google+. But you can also share posts that you want to read later or “keep for good” in their own circle for future reference.

I’m a big fan of Evernote. I use it almost daily to, yes, write notes, but also to file videos and links that I want to later access to.

When I’m logged into my Google+ account and see posts in my stream that I want to keep for research, I share them to my “SharetoEvernote” circle.

 

Ray Hiltz Google+ Share2Evernote circle

I created this circle but instead of putting a group of people in it, I only I just put one person in it. Well, not really a person – my special Evernote email address.

Here’s the basic steps: (From Insideplus.com)

1. Get hold of your Evernote email address. If you login to Evernote at Evernote.com it will be on your settings page – “account info”

2. Log in to Google+ and click the Circles page.

3. Click the new circle.

4. Name your new Circle “Evernote” or whatever you like. I named mine “Share2Evernote”.

5. Click add a new person and insert your Evernote email address.

6. Once you have added the email address, click “Create circle with 1 person”.

Because your Evernote circle is essentially an email entity, make sure you check the box: also email 1 person not yet using Google+ (as shown in the above screen shot).

 

Ray Hiltz Google+ Share2Evernote circle 2

 

Using Circles to bookmark G+ posts.

 

As I said earlier, the +1 tab only works for links outside of Google+.

So how do we keep posts that we  want to read later that we see in our Google+ streams?

Here’s a couple suggestions:

1. As with the Evernote circle, create a “Read it Later Circle” and just put yourself in it. When you come across a post you want to keep, share it with only yourself. Sounds a bit selfish, doesn’t it?

2. Or, as I do, I share things to my “Share2Evernote” circle but don’t check the email box. The posts remain there and I don’t need to add more clutter by creating yet another circle.

Hope this helps.

Have you any other suggestions for organizing your “keep for good” posts?

 

About Ray Hiltz

Ray Hiltz is a Google Plus Specialist and Social Media Strategist helping small businesses establish their brands and build their communities on the social web. A strong proponent for the power of collaborative communication and "humanized" digital networking, Ray writes about social media, social business and Google Plus. His clients include hotels, restaurants, consulting firms, entrepreneurs, writers and individuals just trying to make sense of "social". Ray is a popular speaker on Social Media, Social Business and Google+.

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